Collecting Seeds Part II–Daylilies

Thanks to Sophie Cusson  for the inspiration, and numerous youtube videos  for the background of this post–Collecting Seeds Part II.

About 4 years ago I read about hybridizing your own daylilies, which sounded like something I should try. I was only reading about it at the time, and couldn’t quite figure out how this was going to happen, but I persisted, and ended up with lots of seeds that year. Stored them in the fridge until the following spring, and these are the progeny of that year and the next years’ efforts.

I carefully wrote out the names of the parents–“red spidery flower with plain yellow flower”, since I didn’t know the names of anything I owned. Or didn’t own, as in “red spidery flower with purple flower in front of bank”. And then of course neglected to save the labels with the seeds…

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This is one of my favourites. I’d love to call it something…

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Haven’t decided whether this is too dull–I’ll give it another year, it may yet mature to a slightly different colour

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After all these years, still can’t take very good pictures of red.

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The purple is a little dull, but if it’s next to some vivid yellows or oranges, might be pretty.

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LOVE LOVE LOVE this. Definitely have to name it!

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I think this is called a “spider” form, which was one of the features I was trying for.

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I”m getting a little better with reds–this one really is this bright.

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Did this really come from my seeds? I did buy some from a seed trader that first year…

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‘Pandora’s Box’–have to admit to having actually bought it as a plant from Ontario.

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Colour’s not very interesting, but the shape is amazing!

Now for some totally forgettable ones that I’ll pull out and give away–or throw away (unlike with the genetics of children, if I don’t like how the genes mixed up, I can just discard the resulting plant.)

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Ugh.

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Very dull.

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Tagged for removal, altho’ the shape is sweet.

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Very tagged!

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Also tagged.

So that’s my seed collection post for today. Do you want to try for yourself? Pretty easy to do, and the joy of seeing something no one but God has ever seen before is VERY NEAT!

Comments? Questions? Click follow and share–see what others have to say.

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Multiply Your Stock of Plants: Collect Seeds

There are some annuals in my garden that I just want more of, or I want to be able to give away to friends, so I make a point of collecting seeds as often as I can. But in many cases here in balmy Metro Vancouver, I don’t have to do the work, the plants do it for me.

Some annuals and biennials act like perennials. For example Foxglove and Sweet William are biennials, which means they have a two year cycle and then die. After they flower, they set seed, which falls to the ground. Next spring the seed germinates, and puts on herbaceous (green) growth, goes dormant in the fall. The second growing year puts on floriferous (flowering) growth. Then sets seed and dies. If the weather is favourable, and if they fall early enough, they may set seed, fall, germinate and start their first year of growth the same summer, then produce flowers the next year, their second year. So you had flowers this year, and you’ll have flowers next year.  Biennials, but they act like perennials.

Foxglove

Foxglove

Foxglove setting seed

Foxglove setting seed, still completely green, these won’t be ready for at least another month.

Then there’s snapdragons or larkspur. They’re annuals, but they set seed so well, and disperse if so effectively, they’ll grow more next year close by, and probably grow more than you had this year.

Snapdragon seed heads, not ripe yet.

Snapdragon seed heads, not ripe yet.

Seed head open, and black seeds visible.Columbine seed head open, and black seeds visible.

If you want to be sure to increase your stock, collect the seeds yourself, so you’ll get them before the chickadees do. You can either sow them right away, or save them in an airtight envelope in a cool place (fridge would do, not freezer) over the winter and sow in spring. You can even “winter sow” them–in containers, left outside in a secure area away form the racoons and the strong winter winds– and see them come up all nice and safe and prolific in the spring.

Want help figuring out how to collect seeds, or what to do with them once you do? Post a comment or question. Follow this blog to get more, or follow our Facebook page.