How to Maintain your Paver Paths and Patios

I’ve seen a lot of brick paver hardscaping that is full of weeds, or sunken in patches, or worn and stained. Who knew there was a right and a wrong way of managing your brick pavers?

The wrong way is just not doing anything. We live in a fallen world, friends, and NOTHING is maintenance-free. Your bathroom needs cleaning, your grass needs cutting, your kids need discipline, and your pavers need maintaining.

How to Maintain your Paver Paths and Patios

Here’s a great youtube video on maintaining your pavers, thanks to the Brick Paver Doctor.┬áHere’s another, courtesy of the manufacturer, Sakrete.

So– how to:

1. Power wash the path/patio. Get rid of dirt, moss/mildew, and weeds.

2. Sweep up the debris–the power washing makes quite a mess!

3. Fill the joints with polymeric sand. Polymeric sand creates a firm but flexible bond between the pavers, and deters weeds.

4. Repeat every two or three years.

Now that I’ve seen a solution to the inevitable weeds in the paver joints problem, I feel a lot better about designing with bricks and smaller pavers.

PATHS AND STRUCTURE AND MULCH, OH MY!

Five days and untold number of labour-hours later, the mountain of mulch is gone, and a new one has appeared. Most of the mountain has been translocated to a spot behind the carport.

Here’s what it looked like 5 days ago

DSCN1072

A few wheelbarrow-loads have been moved already…

And from the other side, just to get a better perception of how much this is…

It's about 5' high, 10'across. That means probably about 10 cubic yards.

It’s almost 5′ high, 10’across. That means probably about 8 cubic yards.

Further to my post of May 6, my plan was to use as much as I could making paths through the garden. Having done that–and more than I’d originally planned– I’m really happy with the result, because it gives the garden structure. I didn’t even know it lacked structure!

Like most everyone else, I often look with a certain amount of dissatisfaction at the various areas of the garden, and am never completely sure what is missing. Even having studied design for the last several months, nothing really jumped out at me. Yes, I don’t have “rooms”, but neither do I really want them, nor have much space for them. (That remains to be seen…)

But now I feel like the paths give flow and intentionality to the garden, leading from one area to the next, pretty much a complete circle around the yard.

The path is to the left, the right is currently potato bed and will be a shrub border in the fall.

The path is to the left, the right is currently potato bed and will be a shrub border in the fall.

 

The path coming from the left, leading to the compost bins and the shed, and continuing along the right...

The path coming from the left, leading to the compost bins and the shed, and continuing along the right…

... where the path then goes along the back with a perennial border next to the fence, and vegetable beds to the right. It meets the back patio.

… where the path then goes along the back with a perennial border next to the fence, and vegetable beds to the right. It meets the back patio.

After leaving the pation, we welk along the west fence, with shrubs to the right and left, and a lot of perennials throughout.

After leaving the pation, we welk along the west fence, with shrubs to the right and left, and a lot of perennials throughout.

...finally meeting up with the "translocated mountain of mulch"!

…finally meeting up with the “translocated mountain of mulch”!

So, if you feel your garden is lacking some kind of … something… consider paths.